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Ideas Please (Serious)

#11

Go out and make a calculator in something like Python or actual Lua. Ruby would also work pretty well if you're looking for something easy to follow that isn't syntax heavy. Have it take some input from the user and spit out the answer. If that's too easy, make a matching program that matches the users inputs to their best match in a set of potential matches.

The idea of this is to get kids to think of structuring a program properly and not just trying to create some Garry's Mod content straight off the bat. You don't learn to ride a bike before learning to walk.
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#12

(Saturday, 12-08-2017, 10:15 PM)Multi Wrote: Go out and make a calculator in something like Python or actual Lua. Ruby would also work pretty well if you're looking for something easy to follow that isn't syntax heavy. Have it take some input from the user and spit out the answer. If that's too easy, make a matching program that matches the users inputs to their best match in a set of potential matches.

The idea of this is to get kids to think of structuring a program properly and not just trying to create some Garry's Mod content straight off the bat. You don't learn to ride a bike before learning to walk.

+1 for Ruby. Learnt the language in order to learn Rails last year and I found myself rather enjoying the language. Admittedly less powerful than Python (with ctypes), but is personally simpler to work with; and its block feature is powerful (basically an optional lambda function parameter for any function). Plus the ruby koans make the language easy to learn. Learning Rails or some other web framework is also a very good idea with the demand for full-stack developers out there.

That also reminds me, you tried Elixir? I was going to use it for a project, but the universal maintainability of C++ won out over Elixir/Erlang for concurrency.

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#13

(Monday, 14-08-2017, 03:34 PM)Novus-Ordinis Wrote:
(Saturday, 12-08-2017, 10:15 PM)Multi Wrote: Go out and make a calculator in something like Python or actual Lua. Ruby would also work pretty well if you're looking for something easy to follow that isn't syntax heavy. Have it take some input from the user and spit out the answer. If that's too easy, make a matching program that matches the users inputs to their best match in a set of potential matches.

The idea of this is to get kids to think of structuring a program properly and not just trying to create some Garry's Mod content straight off the bat. You don't learn to ride a bike before learning to walk.

+1 for Ruby. Learnt the language in order to learn Rails last year and I found myself rather enjoying the language. Admittedly less powerful than Python (with ctypes), but is personally simpler to work with; and its block feature is powerful (basically an optional lambda function parameter for any function). Plus the ruby koans make the language easy to learn. Learning Rails or some other web framework is also a very good idea with the demand for full-stack developers out there.

That also reminds me, you tried Elixir? I was going to use it for a project, but the universal maintainability of C++ won out over Elixir/Erlang for concurrency.


Are you using ROR for anything in particular, or just wanting to make some web dev stuff on the side? The fluidity of the language is why I think it's a decent starting point for alot of people, although some will claim it teaches bad habits.

Never tried Elixir, but I've been told by a few uni friends about it. I haven't had much time for personal development things lately, been working on this with Python-3 for the past few weeks. Once I'm done with it I'll give Elixir a close look :^)
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#14

(Tuesday, 15-08-2017, 01:13 AM)Multi Wrote:
(Monday, 14-08-2017, 03:34 PM)Novus-Ordinis Wrote:
(Saturday, 12-08-2017, 10:15 PM)Multi Wrote: Go out and make a calculator in something like Python or actual Lua. Ruby would also work pretty well if you're looking for something easy to follow that isn't syntax heavy. Have it take some input from the user and spit out the answer. If that's too easy, make a matching program that matches the users inputs to their best match in a set of potential matches.

The idea of this is to get kids to think of structuring a program properly and not just trying to create some Garry's Mod content straight off the bat. You don't learn to ride a bike before learning to walk.

+1 for Ruby. Learnt the language in order to learn Rails last year and I found myself rather enjoying the language. Admittedly less powerful than Python (with ctypes), but is personally simpler to work with; and its block feature is powerful (basically an optional lambda function parameter for any function). Plus the ruby koans make the language easy to learn. Learning Rails or some other web framework is also a very good idea with the demand for full-stack developers out there.

That also reminds me, you tried Elixir? I was going to use it for a project, but the universal maintainability of C++ won out over Elixir/Erlang for concurrency.


Are you using ROR for anything in particular, or just wanting to make some web dev stuff on the side? The fluidity of the language is why I think it's a decent starting point for alot of people, although some will claim it teaches bad habits.

Never tried Elixir, but I've been told by a few uni friends about it. I haven't had much time for personal development things lately, been working on this with Python-3 for the past few weeks. Once I'm done with it I'll give Elixir a close look :^)
Was more just learning it from sheer interest in the platform. I heard about it back when we had to do a webapp in PHP for a university group assignment (which went as well as could be expected - not very well at all). Especially since I had spent the previous semester wrangling with the release candidate version of ASP.NET 6/Core and Entity Framework 7 for a university project. Compared to ASP.NET Core, Ruby On Rails 5 was way more mature and better to work with, especially given its excellent testing framework. Was considering it for a work project, but said project took a major detour that removed the need for a web framework.

Main downside (IMO) to Ruby is mostly the lack of an equivilent to Python's CTypes. And a much smaller community than Python. And the GIL (global interpreter lock), that always hurts the viability of scripted languages (no multi-core processing).

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#15

If you want to code something, i saw a video on youtube about a guy who built a robot to shine a laser in his eyes, maybe give that a crack
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#16

(Wednesday, 16-08-2017, 09:31 PM)TheDevastator05 Wrote: If you want to code something, i saw a video on youtube about a guy who built a robot to shine a laser in his eyes, maybe give that a crack

link?
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#17

i was going to make a bot for breach to record 10 seconds before death for rdm reports but you can do it for me
IRL: POTATO

SCP-BREACH: ACTIVE MEMBER (APPLYING FOR TRUSTED)

BHOP: RAGE-QUITTER

DARK-RP: BROKE DUMBASS

DEATHRUN: RIP (WAS MY FIRST SERVER THO)
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